Just married, Just moved, Just found out the cancer has returned…

just marriedA few weeks ago a beautiful young woman in her twenties, with an infectious smile, and a lovely British accent showed up at the door of our After the Boxes are Unpacked class. I welcomed her with open arms, introduced her to the other women in class, and asked her the usual questions–where are you from and how long have you lived here?

Emily and her husband came from New Zealand. They had been married for two weeks and had been in Phoenix for only two days, arriving here right after their honeymoon. Oh.my.goodness. My first thought was literally, just married, just moved…and so young to be so far from home and family.

Emily went on to share that she had taken an Uber taxi to class that morning since she didn’t even have an American driver’s license yet. That’s just determination. If I had moved only two days ago, my mind would still be whirling with unpacking boxes and finding my coffee pot, much less finding a class someone told me about — even if it was about moving. 

As we continued to talk, I said, “Would you take a few minutes to just tell me your story?”

The words spilled out like a river overflows after a massive storm. Last year Emily had been diagnosed with cancer, had surgery to remove the tumor, planned a wedding, a move—and a future without cancer.  After a routine check-up, it was discovered the cancer had returned. Now here they were — just married, just moved, and just found out the cancer had returned….

As Emily shared her story with our group, it was obvious she had a strong faith and trusted God with all the unknowns she was facing. It wasn’t the typical unknowns you face with a move— not knowing if you’ll like living in an unfamiliar place, whether the new job will work out, or when you’ll begin to put down roots and feel like you belong.

No, the unknowns Emily faced were not knowing the best cancer specialists, what the right treatment plan would be, what the side effects would be like, would she be cancer free, and even how all of this would affect a new marriage. I can imagine it was just overwhelming to think about these things instead of the joy of wedding memories.

As we circled around Emily and prayed, tears of compassion and feelings of empathy filled the room. Words of encouragement came from a cancer survivor who God had placed at Emily’s table, sitting right next to her. A sense of community began to emerge among this group of newcomers, many of whom faced their own challenges and struggles with moving. I could see their focus shifting from their own needs to the needs of this young woman. I could see the body of Christ at work as the women began to plan meals for the freezer and rides to the cancer center for the long weeks ahead of chemo and radiation.

I don’t believe that it was a coincidence, or by chance, that Emily came to our class that day. I believe God brought her there to experience His amazing love through a group of newcomers who He just happened to bring together for a time such as this.

You might want to keep these tips close to heart in case God wants someone to experience His amazing love through you. I have a feeling He just might.

Be available. Let people know you have the time and desire to help out. They won’t know if you don’t tell them.
Be aware. Observe and listen to people and situations around you.
Be sensitive.  You never know what’s going on in people’s lives, how desperate they are, or how hopeless they feel.
Be accepting. Don’t judge a person from the outside until you know her on the inside. Someone might look like they have it all together, but not many of us do.
Ask, don’t assume. Ask what the specific need is, how you might help, when the best time would be to get together.

If God nudges you to do something for someone, do it. Don’t put it off and end up regretting that you did nothing or find that it’s too late to do anything.

God will do incredible things through you and in you, as you live out Jesus to others.  Just watch and see…

Christ has no body now on earth but yours.
No hands, no feet on earth but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which he looks compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good.
Yours are the hands through which he blesses all the world…
(Teresa of Avila)

From My Heart to Yours,

Susan Miller signature

 

18 Ways to Reach out to a Military Family Who Has Moved to Your Community

military familyThis is PCS season in the lives of many military families. The orders come, the new duty stations are assigned, and families are gearing up for yet another move. The news of who’s moving where splatters my Facebook pages this time of year. Our connection through social media keeps me in the loop of their lives with their pictures, stories, and prayer requests. They live with a resilient spirit of hope, perseverance, and optimism that defines the life that comes with being a military wife and mom.

Through Just Moved Ministry, God has given me the privilege to be in the lives of military women all over the world. I am in my sweet spot of ministry when I can teach, mentor, encourage, listen to, pray for, and be with these women. From year to year, I see many of them again in different parts of the world and at different military installations. They become a part of my life, my heart, my prayers, and my memories.

They have become my friends and I have become their cheerleader.

You can do the same thing. Be a friend and a cheerleader to the military wife. Show tangible ways of love and care, pray for her, and encourage her. When a military family moves in your neighborhood or community, make every effort to meet them.

The following suggestions, in their own words, come straight from military women who shared with me how you can reach out to them when they move.

  1. While a greeting and a smile is always appreciated, don’t let it stop there. Be bold. Keep calling, encouraging, and inviting us to lunch, shopping, etc.
  2. Provide us with a list of local services: a handyman, mechanic, hairstylist, babysitters, churches, restaurants, etc.
  3. Offer to be our emergency contact for schools. That’s the first question the schools ask, and the one we never have an answer for.
  4. Offer to drive us to functions. We don’t know our way around, and that would encourage us to go.
  5. Invite us to church, or even lunch or dinner on Sunday. That’s a lonely day for us.
  6. Express your support. We appreciate hearing and reading your encouragement.
  7. Let us know you are praying for our soldier and for our family. Ask about our specific prayer needs. Don’t assume you know.
  8. Please don’t wait for us to ask or come to you. Knock on our door, talk to us at the mailbox, invite us over when we are out in the yard.
  9. We spend so much time making sure our children are settled in, but we don’t take care of ourselves during these transition times. I need to be included in Bible study, a girls’ night out, a lunch group.
  10. Accept new military families as if they are moving in for a lifetime–not just passing through. Please invest time in us.
  11. Include us in neighborhood parties. Wear name tags to help us learn names.
  12. People have picked up our check at a restaurant, or even paid for a cup of coffee. It brings tears to my eyes every time. Our family is so grateful.
  13. Churches can be a great help in our transitions. Welcome us and include us along with other newcomers at functions and events.
  14. Invite our children over for a play date.
  15. On special occasions or holidays at school or church, honor the dads or moms who are deployed. This means so much to our children.
  16. When my husband was deployed, a family in our church “adopted” our family. They helped us with house and yard maintenance, celebrated Birthdays, and included us for holidays. We will never forget them or what that meant to us.
  17. Be understanding and be listeners. Sometimes our needs go beyond a plate of cookies.
  18. Risk a broken heart. Love and support a military family even though we will eventually move and leave you. Allow your children to love ours as well, even though they may be sad when we leave.

So bring out your pom-poms and be their cheerleaders.

It’s time to get off the bleachers and move from the sidelines to run with military families to the finish line!

 

 

SusanSusan Miller

From Susan’s updated and expanded new edition of After the Boxes are Unpacked. A Focus on the Family and Tyndale book available from Just Moved Ministry.

 

Share my joy!


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First, you might need a little back story…

Not only was 2015 the twentieth anniversary of Just Moved Ministry, it was also the twentieth anniversary of my book that launched the ministry, After the Boxes are Unpacked. Wow! Just thinking about the lives touched for Christ through this ministry and this book – for twenty years – brings me to my knees in total acknowledgement and awe that God, and only God, gets the credit, the praise, the kudos, the pat on the back, the applause, and the standing ovation for what only He could accomplish.

I founded Just Moved Ministry in 1995, after 14 moves with Bill’s career in the hotel business. I lived, felt, and experienced what women go through when their lives are uprooted by moving.  I get how moving can rock your world, and shake your foundation to the core – whether you are married or single, have children or not, young or old, working or retired. Helping women get through the emotional rollercoaster and chaos of a move became my purpose. Introducing them to Jesus Christ and His words of hope and encouragement became my passion.

Soon after the inception of Just Moved, I wrote After the Boxes are Unpacked, published by Focus on the Family. FOTF has partnered with me for twenty years on this book and a later book, But Mom, I Don’t Want to Move! It is a privilege to be associated with them in ministry, both professionally and personally.

Updated After the Boxes are Unpacked coming soon!They refer to After the Boxes… as an “evergreen” book with a timeless message for uprooted women. I guess they were right, it has sold over 100,000 copies and continues to help women going through a major life change.

Never in my wildest dreams could I have imagined that FOTF would ever consider After the Boxes… worthy of updating and revising after twenty years. I had visions of it eventually fading into the sunset, and becoming a faint memory as the years passed. But God had other plans beyond what I could have dreamed or imagined.

The revision process began with emails and phone calls back and forth, resulting in a new book proposal that had to be approved. FOTF caught the vision, saw the endless need, and wanted to “move” forward by having me update and revise the book to produce a new edition that will reach the next generation! It meant a new cover, new material, revised terminology, expanded chapters – while, at the same time, keeping the core message and three-step process which is, indeed, tried and true to all generations of movers. It took months of writing, revising, updating, editing, and prayer.

What will happen in 2016

The new book, with a new cover and same title, will be released April 2016! Woo hoo!! I will give you a sneak-peek into some of the new stuff between now and then.

On the heels of finishing the book, I started updating and revising the Teacher’s Study Guide, the Newcomer’s Workbook, and the DVD Facilitator’s Guide to accompany the book. If you are a teacher or facilitator, start smiling now!

And it’s not over yet! January 25-27, I will be filming a new Video Series – a process that will take three days! I am scared silly. Please pray for me!

By April 1st, Lord be willing and the creek don’t rise, we should be ready to release everything at the same time! Hoo-ray!!

April 2nd, I will sleep for a week, eat cheesecake, drink afternoon lattes, read a novel, catch up on Downton Abbey, go to lots of movies and consume the large bag of popcorn!

And, I say with all my heart, and mind, and soul…

To God be the glory, great things He has, and is, doing!!
Susan Miller signature

 

A picture of gratitude

Susan Miller, America's Moving CoachlistI am a list maker. I have lists on my phone, on post notes, and on scratch paper. I confess,  I will even list something I’ve done and draw a line through it just to visually see my accomplishments. I have a pretty notebook for special long-term lists–categorized by subject, of course. I am a very well-organized, well-functioning, obsessive list maker. A list clears my mind, prioritizes my day, keeps me on track, and most of all, helps me to remember what I would normally forget.

My usual list-making for Thanksgiving is a grocery list. I go through all my traditional Thanksgiving recipes and write down all the ingredients that I don’t keep in my cabinet the other 364 days. Going through the family recipes for the holidays is a tradition in itself. It turns back the years of memories, not only in my kitchen, but also in my grandmother’s and my mother’s kitchen, as we assembled and prepared the ingredients, then cooked and baked for Thanksgiving Day. I have to tell you that I actually came across an old, handwritten list my mother had made for ingredients that had been tucked in some of her treasured recipes. One day, I’m sure my daughter will find one of my lists among the recipes too. And so it goes…

Around Thanksgiving, it seems the conversation starters, or question probers, are to make a list of things you are grateful for. It’s a question that’s asked around the Thanksgiving table, when friends gather together, in casual conversation, and on social media. Gratitude lists are shared and commented on in articles, blogs, and newsletters, and are discussed on talk shows, the national news, and commercials.

I love reading, or hearing the list of a grateful heart. You and I should have a long list every day, because God doesn’t give us a short list of blessings. They are bountiful, they overflow with abundance. Even if you don’t list them all on paper, extend the list to ponder in your heart. The spoken and unspoken gratitude list brings us to a place of being humbly aware of God’s grace, mercy and blessings in our life.

Since I am such a visual person, my written gratitude list is going to look a little different this time. I’m going to share some pictures from my phone that have been taken over the past year of people, places, and things. They speak volumes for my grateful heart.

gratitude list in pictures

Happy Thanksgiving y’all! It’s time to gather recipes and a grateful heart…

Susan Miller signature@SusanJustMoved

 

Strange Things Come in Small Packages

envelope Each week our office staff sends books and study materials to leaders of our Moving On After Moving In groups all over the world. They are carefully packed in all different sized boxes and padded envelopes. Each box is assembled by hand to fit the materials being shipped, and then taped securely to ensure a safe arrival. The same goes for our packing envelopes.

This is where our story begins…in a packing envelope.

Jana, one of our new leaders, will be starting a Moving On… group in Ballston Lake, New York soon. (Yay! We need one there with all the new families moving to the Albany area!) Jana called our office to order books and materials, and before you knew it, she and JoAnn, the National  Coordinator for all our groups, became fast friends. (This is so typical of our JoAnn. She becomes fast friends with all our leaders, not only giving five-star service, but praying for them and their families.)

So…JoAnn personally filled Jana’s order in a large, padded, packing envelope. She carefully filled it, sealed it, and off it went. A week later, JoAnn received an email that read:

…Today I opened the much-anticipated book and materials from Just Moved. Thanks, JoAnn, for sending me all the information and for a lovely and encouraging phone call about starting this group in my area. 

When I opened the envelope, I discovered something that decided to move on. He must have read Susan’s book, got excited about his move, but has now moved on to a better place…. 

There was a dead lizard inside the envelope!!  (Jana took this picture for proof…)  Never, in all our 18 years of ministry, has there ever been a report of anything dead or alive in anything we have shipped!  The only thing we can figure out, is that it came in the shipment of packing envelopes, dead and buried deep within the box. lizard

Relieved that Jana had a sense of humor about receiving “Godzilla” in her order, our staff and volunteers have gotten a lot of mileage out of the lizard story. We’ve come up with an assortment of names, from Lizzie to Leopold. We’ve devised a shipping checkpoint for unknown objects. We’ve started searching all envelopes at the door.

Yes my friends, there’s never a dull moment at the Just Moved Office. We ended 2013 with many of your funny stories, but also hundreds of your heartwarming ones. There were stories about your happy moves and your sad moves, your testimonies of faith and endurance during the hard times, and perseverance and hope through dire circumstances. You saw God working in and through a move in your life, and in the life of your family. And then there were those of you who came face to face with a Jesus you never really knew until a move shook your world.

As we begin 2014 together, we can’t wait to hear your stories, laugh and cry with you across the miles, encourage your heart, and most of all, keep “moving” you closer to Jesus through Just Moved Ministry.

Have a blessed and Christ-centered New Year!

From My Heart to Yours,

Susan Miller signature

My military heroes, my friends

My heart is still beating with joy from speaking to the Schofield Barracks Army Post military wives at their PWOC Conference in Hawaii. We even had some women there who came from Hickam Air Force Base. The icing on the cake was meeting with the women who attend the Moving On group at the chapel.

Moving On group at Schofield Barracks

After spending time with these incredible women, I had the privilege of seeing God’s word bring hope, comfort, and encouragement to so many lives that have been uprooted by moving. We laughed and cried as we shared our joy and our pain together. We prayed for one another and joined hands in worship. We walked away feeling refreshed and renewed in our spirits as we focused on Christ and not our circumstances.

These precious women are in the trenches of military life, many of whom are holding their families together in the absence of their husbands who are deployed. They face the unknown with brave hearts and a strong faith. Many have just moved and are experiencing the adjustment and transition of being in unfamiliar surroundings and starting all over again. Then there are those who are facing the challenges of yet another move that has become an expected part of military life. They, too, face the unknown with a persevering heart and a strong faith.

My life is never the same after I am in the presence of military women. They touch my heart, strengthen my faith, and keep me humble. They are ordinary women who are called to do extraordinary things as wives and moms. When you stop and pray for the men and women who are serving our country in the Armed Forces, remember to pray for the spouses and families left behind. They, too, are my heroes!

Here are eight ways you can join our Just Moved Ministry Team in praying for our military:

  • Safety and protection for deployed spouses
  • Strong marriages during stressful circumstances
  • Healing of broken relationships
  • Provision for uprooted families
  • Encouragement for uprooted moms
  • Smooth transitions and adjustments for uprooted children
  • Comfort in the midst of the physical and emotional effects of a PCS (transfer)
  • Military families to put their trust and hope in Jesus Christ.

My presence will go with you….  Exodus  33:14

Susan Miller signature

A Summer To-Be List

 

To be list

Is your summer to-do list growing? Mine sure is. Over the next few months, my calendar looks full, not empty. It’s not supposed to be that way. The summer months are supposed to be my time to think about ministry plans for next year, quietly listen to God’s voice, rest my body and soul, renew and refresh my mind.

I am beginning to feel resentful of the time that is so quickly slipping away. Once fall is here, I’m back on the merry-go-round of a wonderful, blessed, but full life. I yearn for a break—to read a good novel, to wander aimlessly through Wal-Mart, to sleep in without guilt, to have nothing scheduled to do for a whole day. It’s so easy for me to focus on the to-do list, rather than the to-be list. Summer is a time I want to “be” more, and “do” less…

 

I want to be more spontaneous, and less cautious.

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I want to be more of a listener, and less a talker.

I want to be more patient, and less annoyed.

I want to be more authentic, and less guarded.

I want to be more of a risk-taker, and less afraid.

I want to be more understanding, and less critical.

I want to be more determined, and less indecisive.

I want to be more willing, and less hesitant.

I want to be more loving, and less judgmental.

I want to be more forgiving, and less intolerant.

And then, I stop and think. I’m looking at my full calendar, when I should be looking at my empty heart—a heart that is weary and worn out from the craziness of a full, non-stop life. It doesn’t matter if it’s winter, spring, summer, or fall—God controls my schedule (and yours) when we give it all to Him. He fills our neediness and instills in us the ability to change our thinking, actions, and behavior.

“Are you tired? Worn out? Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me—watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly.”  Matthew 11:28 (The Message)

l know who I want to be with…where I can go to be more… It’s now at the top of my list.

Susan Miller signature

For a time such as this

God is faithful

Have you ever walked away from a perfect day that left a smile on your face and memories in your heart? I had a day like that at our Spring Luncheon and Auction to benefit Just Moved Ministry. Oh, you would have loved it too! Our theme was “ Stepping Stones of Faithfulness,” and 200 women enjoyed the ambiance of a beautiful place overlooking spring flowers and a lake, stunning decorations, connecting with friends, browsing (and buying) our amazing auction items, and a wonderful three-course lunch served in grand style. Over 30 volunteers, and our staff, worked months to plan, prepare, and create; and gave sacrificially their time and talent to make it a glorious day.

As part of the program, some of our newcomers shared their stepping stone of God’s faithfulness in their move. One young woman said her stone was “trust”, and that she had learned to trust God with the unwanted changes that have altered her life since moving. Another woman’s stone was “joy”, and she shared how God returned joy to her life and her marriage since she moved.  As  woman after woman shared her testimony, wrapped with God’s faithfulness, emotions were stirred throughout the room, and there wasn’t a dry eye among us.

It was fun and enlightening for everyone as I shared how far and wide our Moving On After Moving In groups reach:

From Florida to AlaskaMoving On groups around the world

Ohio to California

Hawaii to Virginia

Louisiana to Belgium

Kentucky to Iowa

Arkansas to Montana

North Carolina to The Netherlands!

And then all the women loved hearing the quote posted on the Just Moved Facebook page from the leader of the Ex-pats group in The Netherlands:

“What do Malaysia, Taiwan, Russia, Brazil, Greece, the Netherlands and the US have in common? All those nationalities have been represented at Just Moved Eindhoven!” (A town in The Netherlands.)

I will savor the sweetness of that day for a long time. I am reminded that Just Moved not only has an impact on lives for Christ all over the world, but is also a community of women who are committed, faithful, and devoted to serve Jesus through this ministry. For these things, I am most grateful.

From My Heart to Yours,

Susan Miller signature

Ordinary women called to do extraordinary things

Military wives: unsung heroes of our militarymilitary wife

Imagine the fear and anxiety of being a military spouse who has not heard from her husband, doesn’t know exactly where he is, or what he is doing. She simply waits. She has no option other than to trust and have faith that the phone will ring, the text or email will come, or his face will appear on Skype—anything to reassure her that he is okay. Imagine how she feels when her husband’s mission is so classified that he cannot share the stress he endures daily. Think about the strain on her marriage and on her children when a PCS (a move), or deployment comes–again, and then, again.

I had the privilege to be with many military wives who live with these situations at the PWOC  international military conference in Nashville, Tennessee recently. Needless to say, I have a soft spot in my heart for these women, many of them young enough to be my daughter. They have gone through things that most people, who do not live in a military world, will not experience in a lifetime. They are ordinary women, who are called to do extraordinary things as they serve on the front lines at home, while their husbands serve our country. They face the daily battles of loneliness, fear, and anxiety with perseverance, resilience, and, above all, an unwavering hope and trust in Jesus Christ.

Story after story touched my heart, and strengthened my faith. Jesus was always at the center of each conversation, the anchor for their survival. As I prayed with Mary*, the tears flowed over the heartache of a rebellious son who desperately needed his deployed father. Sue, who I had met at a military conference in Germany, wouldn’t let go of me as we embraced. She shared that her marriage was falling apart, and she didn’t know how to put the pieces back together again. Katherine, married one year and pregnant, was moving to a remote military base in Japan to be with her husband. She was anxious about a different culture, a foreign language and being so far from family. We hovered in a corner and I listened as she expressed her fear of the unknown.

These women, along with countless others, are my heroes. I am one of their biggest fans. I will stand on the sidelines of their lives and pray for peace, comfort, and victory in the midst of their circumstances. May we never forget to pray for our soldiers who serve our country, and for those who are in harm’s way, for their spouses who keep the home fires burning, and for their children who struggle with the uprooting and upheaval of change. Just imagine what our prayers can do…

Susan Miller

*names have been changed

 

Knee Deep in Lemonade and Life Lessons

Cousin CampCamp NanaPapa, better known as Cousin Camp, has come to an end for another summer. Every July, I look forward  to having all six grandchildren, ages seven to thirteen, together for a cousin reunion. They make crafts and bake cookies, play board games and kickball, swim and bike ride, take long walks and watch movies. They laugh and cry, scuff knees and feelings, stay up late, and sleep in, drink gallons of lemonade, and eat countless peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. I love every minute. I watch, participate, listen, and learn. I have captured the memories with pictures, and have tucked the tender moments in my heart.

God continues to teach me life lessons through the world of my grandchildren, and reminds me of things I know, but can easily forget in the busyness of my daily life. I thought I would share a few things God taught me at Cousin Camp this summer.

It’s not about me. I learned to put aside my schedule, my agenda, and my wants. Cousin Camp is just that—it’s all about the cousins.

Have no expectations. The sooner I learned to relax and let go of any expectations of our time together, the smoother the days went, and the more fun we had.  God had to work with me on this one!

Above all, don’t compare. I was reminded that comparing grandsons and granddaughters who are different ages, have different personalities and temperaments, and come from two different family life-styles, is so unfair to the child. Accepting their differences allows each one to be who God made them to be, without the pressure of performance to please.

Movies vs. games. There is a huge difference in watching movies, and playing board games together. You have to be quiet to listen and watch a movie. Board games encourage conversation and interaction. There is a time for both, but I learned not to defer to movies to keep everyone occupied.

Crafts are good for all ages. I was surprised to learn that everyone from seven to thirteen, both boys and girls, loved doing crafts! It was fun, messy, and an opportunity for them to express their individual creativity. A lot of things happened. They shared ideas and supplies, learned from each other, and complimented each other on what they did.                                                                        

Deck talk is magic. After dinner, we would sit on the deck, with only a few lanterns to give us a glow in the dark. It was amazing how the conversation flowed, when there were no distractions. With a few questions, I learned about what they were thinking, things they were doing, and caught a glimpse of life through their eyes.

A little space is a good thing. Every child needs some time and space to do their own thing. I learned they don’t have to always do everything together, or in a group.

It’s caught, not taught. Kindness, thoughtfulness, and being considerate of others are best caught through the example of how I treat them, and others. Pointing out the error of their ways, in front of everyone else can be embarrassing and humiliating. If I had to resort to correct someone’s behavior, I would do it one-on-one, away from everyone else. We would sit on the floor together, eye level, and talk it through, ending with a hug and a smile that conveyed my unconditional love.

Choose your battles. I learned to ask myself—“Is this a hill high enough to die for?  Am I making a mountain out a mole hill? At the end of the day, will it really matter?”

A sense of humor goes a long way. I learned to lighten up, laugh a lot, and that being silly brings giggles from all ages.

Manners matter.  Please, thank-you, excuse me, I’m sorry, chew with your mouth shut, elbows off the table—have always been a part of “Nana’s Manners” and manners are not left at the door at Cousin Camp.  My daughter often says in jest, “You don’t want to have to go to “Nana’s Manners School”—it lasts for two hours!”  I learned that you don’t give up on what matters.                                                                                                                           

Hold hands and stick together.  Cousin Camp is all about connecting with each other, building memories, and learning the importance of being a part of something bigger than yourself—your family. I learned that when you encourage them to hold hands, and stick together, one day you will have the joy of seeing them do it on their own.

I am also reminded that these are not just lessons learned regarding my grandchildren, but also with my adult children and their spouses, extended family, friendships, and those I serve with in ministry. Lord, keep teaching me, reminding me, and never let me forget. Humble me all the more…

Susan Miller

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